top of page

WRITING WORKSHOP: Imaginative Prompts


Getting students writing imaginatively is most often a challenge of getting them started. Use the following prompts.

SOME TIPS BEFORE YOU LAUNCH

  • Get students into the mind-frame of experimenting. These are exercises. Remind them why we exercise. To strengthen. To find out our areas of natural ability and where we are a little weak.

  • Build an atmosphere of play. Not everything needs to be completed. They may well find a use for fragments at a later stage.

  • Never give students more than 2 or 3 choices. Too many choices wastes your best ideas and can become as intimidating to students as a blank page or the old “write about anything” terror.

  • Many of these prompts are best given to a whole class, one prompt at a time, with a time limit. Leave time afterwards to read a couple out and share. Those who love what they’ve written will happily go away and continue it as a larger piece. Others can simply treat it as a learning or experimental exercise.

  • It can be great fun and energising for a class to attempt 4 or 5 of these in 8 minute bursts (say) with 2-4 minutes sharing after each one. By the end of your lesson, each student has a bunch of writing and ca be set the task of choosing one (or combining several) to craft a complete piece. What’s more, you have your evidence of the students starting the work on their own and can rule out unwanted assistance and plagiarism while showing them they are perfectly capable of enjoying the creative process.


PRESENTING THE PROMPTS

As teacher, read out the prompt, let it hang in the air. Read it again. Add it visually to the board if you wish. The ask them to start writing. There are no rules. Simply see where the prompt takes them. Keep time. Many teachers enjoy having a go themselves while the class is immersed. It is a valuable exercise, and instructive.


See how engaged they are. 5 - 8 minutes is ideal. You want to stop them when most are still writing. If some are disappointed to be stopped, all the better. They can return to them later. Announce, "Two more minutes...one minute...okay, pens down."

Let them sigh, chatter a little. Invite one or two students to read a little of what they wrote. You might ask a particular student to read their first few lines. Keep it casual.

PROMPTS 1. An unexpected arrival. A letter, an email, or a package arrives. 2. A character is in a tricky situation. Maybe her car has broken down in the middle of nowhere. Or she is lost and late for an important meeting. Or her cat has vomited on her sister's wedding dress. 3. The box.

*********** DOWNLOAD THE COMPLETE LESSON ************


THIS IS A TIME-TESTED WINNING LESSON.

FOR LESS THAN THE PRICE OF A CUP OF COFFEE,

YOU CAN TAKE ADVANTAGE OF

OVER 30 YEARS OF TEACHING EXPERIENCE.


IF YOU ARE NOT SATISFIED WITH THE RESULTS, WE WILL GLADLY REFUND YOUR MONEY.

DOWNLOAD THE COMPLETE LESSON NOW FROM OUR SHOP

AND SUPPORT TEACHERS WHO WANT TO SUPPORT YOU.







コメント


bottom of page